SteadyFast Stabilization System
http://www.steadyfast.com/

Hanscom Enterprises LLC
9331 Langley Road
Bakersfield, CA 93312
Office: 661-679-7883
Toll-Free: 1-866-498-8754

Cost: $259 + Shipping
Tools Needed: Center punch, Drill, Wrenched/Sockets.
Optional Tools: Drill Bits, Extra 17/64" Drill bit, 5/16" x 18 Tap
Total Install Time for 2 Pad System: 3.5 hrs.
Difficulty:

 

Front stabilization jack showing the 2 stabilizer bars.

After spending some time in our travel trailer we noticed how badly it shook every time someone moved around inside.  Seemingly insignificant actions like getting up to get a drink of water would send tremors throughout the trailer, usually waking at least one person up.  We were using our stabilizer jacks properly and had gone with the expanding style wheel chocks to keep motion while camping to a minimum, but it was not enough.  Within just a couple strip we decided something more significant had to be done.

After doing some research, I came up with a couple options.  The Steadyfast System and the JT Strong Arm.  After reviewing the installation instructions I concluded the JT StrongArm needed a frame rail spanning the width of the trailer to connect their tie rods to.  Our trailer does not appear to have such a rail so i called the JT tech support.  They answered quickly and were very helpful.  They informed me that the tie rods connect at the center of the trailer on a frame support rail that runs across the trailer.  At the time they did not offer any rail extensions or options that would allow the rails to be connected to the main frame rail on the other side of the trailer.  That eliminated the JT StrongArm system for our application.  Lucky for us though, the SteadyFast system is designed to attach only to the main side rails - no cross rail needed.  So I went to www.steadyfast.com and ordered my stabilizing system.

Front Foot Pad

The system is available in 2 options.  The cheaper option comes with 2 foot pads that attach to the bottom of the stabilizing jacks which the stabilizing bars attach to.  The other end of the stabilizing bars attaches to the frame rails which triangulates the frame to the stabilizing jack - making thinks much more rigid.  Regarless of the system you choose, only one front and one back stabilizing jack gets the triangulating stabilizer bars - the other two jacks remain stock.  For and additional $50, you can order the system with 4 foot pads so all your jacks look the same.  This is purely a cosmetic upgrade as adding the extra foot pads does not change the performance of the systems.  Personally, I'm cheap, practical and lazy so I just went with the 2 pad system.

Installation on our trailer took about 3.5 hours using a drill, the supplied drill bit, a center punch to mark the drill points and hammer driver to drive the self tapping screws into the frame.  Each bracket that attaches to the frame took 3 drill holes and there are 3 brackets (two on the front, one on the rear).  Drilling the holes wasn't too bad, but I did manage to break the supplied drill bit 3/4 of the way through the last hole (of course!).  Fortunately, I had a spare so I would recommend you have at least one as well before you start.

Locking bracket attached to frame.

As far as performance is concerned, it isn't perfect, but it is a lot better.  More then worth the cost and effort.  I would say it knocks down 90-95% of the shaking.  It manages to do that without significantly adding to the set-up and take-down process of moving the trailer.  All in all, we consider the SteadyFast system the most significant single upgrade to our trailer in the comfort department that we've made.  It's absolutely worth the money and effort and we highly recommend installing one if you you're rig suffers from the shakes.

Single bar rear stabilizer

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